Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > Looking for a friend > Get it girl collective

Get it girl collective

Six in 10 girls believe that to do well in life, they have to look a certain way. Since , the Dove Self-Esteem Project has helped more than 20 million young people develop a positive relationship with the way they look, and they will reach an additional 20 million by The workshops are a beloved part of Mom 2. Building a confident generation of girls takes more than words — it takes action. Dove is introducing Girl Collective , a sis terhood that builds body confidence and challenges beauty stereotypes for all women and girls. This sisterhood builds confidence and challenges beauty stereotypes powered by the Dove Self-Esteem Project.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Collective Soul - The World I Know (Official Video)

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Soul Asylum - Runaway Train (Official Video)

Keeping our Waterways Clean: Tips from the Trashy Girls Collective

As the world grows more connected — through displaced populations, the internet, and accessible travel — we need to find ways of adapting positively and supportively to these new circumstances. Laura Doggett and her organization, Another Kind of Girl Collective, which promotes the films and photography of Syrian refugee girls living in Jordan, are wonderful examples of this.

While speaking to Laura on Skype and email over several months, I was struck by her devotion to helping these young women tell their unique stories to the rest of the world.

I also spoke to two girls in the camps, Khaldiya Jibawi and Marah Al Hassan, over Skype with the help of Tasneem Toghoj, the co-facilitator of the collective, who also acted as our translator. I was struck by their bravery and determination to make something out of their circumstances and lives.

I wanted to reflect this in my own work, so I decided to write this piece to show an example of people from different cultures coming together to talk, bond, and work together. The film shows a crowd of corrugated metal buildings. Between them, children play. Scrap metal and pieces of wood are scattered on the ground, along with hammers, saws, rope.

When the sun sets, the sky turns a deep pink and orange, and the buildings are illuminated, flashing red and burnt sienna. At a distance, there is a young girl, maybe four or five years old, wearing a dress decorated with a fabric daisy. She has on one purple shoe and one black sandal. Next to her, older children are playing around; with linked hands, they have formed a circle.

She throws her hands in the air, but when a boy gestures her to join, she runs away, angry. Next, the film shows a boy is using a long length of rope as a whip to thrash a puddle of muddy water. The camera transitions to another little boy who is hammering a metal stake into the hard ground with a saw next to him. The sun hangs low in the sky. The aim of AKOGC and of its founder, Laura Doggett, is to give the girls the needed space, training, and equipment to develop this art form, along with providing a platform for them to share their own stories and experiences.

Through their films and photographs, the girls prove themselves to not be passive and tragic beings, which is sometimes how the media portrays them, but hardworking, creative, smart, and motivated visionaries. According to a United Nations report, at least 5 million people have had to leave their homes in Syria and settle, at least temporarily, elsewhere in other countries, from Turkey to Sweden.

Although thousands of journalists have interviewed refugees in the camp, the stories have often given incomplete or inaccurate portrayals of life in the camps. Laura recognized the need to provide girls in the camps with the necessary equipment and encouragement to document the true stories of their lives, along with a way to connect with others, both in and out of their community.

Laura credits her father, a master storyteller, with helping her find her love of stories. As she grew up, she also read and drew inspiration from authors like Eudora Welty, the Pulitzer Prize-winning American short story writer and novelist.

She recognized the importance of observation and of storytelling and earned her BA in English and Creative Writing. After college, Laura directed a program called the Appalachian Media Institute in Kentucky, teaching young adults how to make documentaries about their communities. She has also helped teenagers in the inner cities of NYC and DC to share their worlds through making their own documentaries about their lives.

Later, she received her MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts from Duke University to better learn how to collaborate with young people and reflect their artistic voices and vision more accurately. One way to understand it is that the girls are different than others in their communities because they are stepping outside of the usual gender roles.

The other way to think about the name is that the girls at the camps want to be recognized as teenage girls, like others their age. They love and enjoy doing the same things as other girls even though they are living in a refugee camp and are growing up in different circumstances. Laura gives the girls an opportunity to take back their stories from the hands of journalists who, as outsiders, are sometimes ill equipped to see the nuances of life in the camps, instead focusing solely on disruption and tragedy.

She gives the equipment to the children in her classes because if they fall in love with the cameras, she wants them to be able to keep them for continued use as they develop their craft and transform their experiences into art.

Some were very resistant the whole way through, but by end of week, they were just out there and it was hard to recognize their faces. She does movement exercises with the girls and encourages them to roam freely and to climb on top of objects, like tables or even low buildings, to gain a fresh perspective.

She wants the girls to get used to carrying a camera, interacting differently with their environment in public, and expressing themselves freely. They were able to see the beautiful things around them. And they could also see the things they felt needed to be changed. They documented everything with determination and drive. So it was just interesting that our girls wanted to learn things, and when we gave them the cameras, they were just excited to use them.

It was something new, and I think that was really interesting to see. Fortunately, I got a chance to interview them through Skype. Khaldiya and Marah told me that they want to show the world that despite their circumstances, they have many good things in their lives. Both girls agree that the collective has changed their paths and goals in a positive light.

With self-confidence, we have hope in life. The girls display resolve and purpose as they produce strong, vibrant, and unique films.

Khaldiya takes the encouragement from her mentors and uses it to keep herself dedicated to make more films. Her results push her to want to keep improving. We strive to rise above our limitations and work toward our dreams.

While the girls work on their films, Laura is tireless in her efforts to promote their work. The girls feel like they have a valuable contribution to give society. The main thing they seek is meaning and purpose to their everyday lives. That people are seeing refugee girls in a new way has been really motivating and really huge for them.

I thought it would be amazing if they could all meet each other and collaborate together to make a project. Laura Doggett is both a mentor and a guide to girls all over the world—from West Virginia and Washington D.

Although much of her current work takes place in the Middle East, her devotion and determination inspires many people from communities around the world.

This is such a heart-warming and inspiring piece of writing. I have always thought of refugee girls live in dire circumstance, without much of any hope for their future, and just glad to be safe and peaceful. After reading this uplifting piece of work, there is great hope after all, stemming from these courageous and determined girls living inside refugee camps.

Kudos to the human spirit. What make this equally amazing is we have a 12 year old reporting on her findings on such a serious topic. I am such a big fan of yours Sabrina! So curious what you going to write next…. Your email address will not be published.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Email address:. There are lots of ways you can get involved and make a difference. Your donation will help Stone Soup continue to inspire creative kids round the world. Subscription inquiries To subscribe, click the Subscribe button above. Email us at subscriptions stonesoup.

General inquiries All other questions and comments should be emailed to stonesoup stonesoup. Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter, and see images from our archive and more on our Instagram and Pinterest pages. By Sabrina Guo, 13 As the world grows more connected — through displaced populations, the internet, and accessible travel — we need to find ways of adapting positively and supportively to these new circumstances.

Comments This is such a heart-warming and inspiring piece of writing. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

Free weekly newsletter! First Name. Last Name. Contact Us Subscription inquiries To subscribe, click the Subscribe button above. Follow us on Social Media Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter, and see images from our archive and more on our Instagram and Pinterest pages.

Amplifying Voices with Another Kind of Girl Collective

You know that app that runners often use? This gentle nudging occurs over long talks, tea and scones, and helps to keep all of them making the art that they want to see in the world. Their collective efforts put them to work on projects and in mediums that spark their interest and take them out of their comfort zones.

Defining the female experience is difficult. We are so diverse, but what brings us together is our common experiences. Made up of three illustrators and one producer, these women have made ….

As the world grows more connected — through displaced populations, the internet, and accessible travel — we need to find ways of adapting positively and supportively to these new circumstances. Laura Doggett and her organization, Another Kind of Girl Collective, which promotes the films and photography of Syrian refugee girls living in Jordan, are wonderful examples of this. While speaking to Laura on Skype and email over several months, I was struck by her devotion to helping these young women tell their unique stories to the rest of the world. I also spoke to two girls in the camps, Khaldiya Jibawi and Marah Al Hassan, over Skype with the help of Tasneem Toghoj, the co-facilitator of the collective, who also acted as our translator. I was struck by their bravery and determination to make something out of their circumstances and lives.

Get it Girl!

Put Yourself Out There. Account Cart 0. We were so inspired by their work, we asked them to tell us a little more about how they got started, and how we can emulate the work they're doing but in our own backyards. Thanks for teaching us a thing or two, Kiki and TGC! I moved to Deerfield Beach, FL almost two years ago from Honduras, and various other parts of the world, to work as a scuba diving instructor. I spent quite a lot of time living in Brooklyn, NY where a lot of my eco-friendly habits started to form; I moved to FL in late and was aghast at the plastic problem, but more so the complete disconnect between humans and respect for the ocean. Perfect example is seeing dudes fishing on their own boat while we're on our dive boat, and seeing them throw their beer cans and cigarette butts directly onto the dinner they're trying to catch. Huge disconnect there. We live in South Florida with beautiful water and nature all around us, yet the idea of banning plastic bags and straws is a foreign subject to a large majority of people, even people that literally have the ocean as their backyard. It becomes very real when you see a sea turtle consuming that plastic bag thinking its a jellyfish, finding and cutting hundreds of feet of discarded fishing line wrapped around beautiful corals, when sea birds are collecting straws and plastic shards to feed to their young, and the list goes on, sadly.

Drink + Draw with Scout Books and Get it Girl Collective

Since its inception in , the With and For Girls Collective; a group of funders who want to see a world where girls are heard, respected, able to access services and are included in decision-making processes that affect them; has had the incredible privilege to support, work alongside, and learn from girls and their organisations, through their unrelenting work to serve their communities and have their voices heard. They continue to show us every day why it is so important for philanthropic funding to support girl-led groups. As a Collective, we believe funders can, and must, play a leadership role in addressing the lack of resources available to grassroots girl-centred and girl-led organisations who we know are still under-recognised, under-represented and under-funded. To further our learning as a Collective we embarked on an independent evaluation to improve, not only our own processes, but also to encourage other donors to take similar steps in centering powerful girl-led groups and understand why grassroots girl-led and girl-centred organisations need to be supported by flexible funding to propel transformational change towards a more equitable world. The With and For Girls Awards identify strong organisations with girls at their centre and provides them with flexible funding, profile raising opportunities and training.

I started running on my own last year and then quickly stopped. However, since finding the Fly Girl Collective, running with likeminded sisters has propelled me to challenge myself and become more consistent.

Girls today are strong and resilient, but there is still a lot of outside noise getting in their way. Negative comments and unequal rules can hurt a young woman's self-esteem, so it's time to create a new, inclusive narrative. Dove and Shonda Rhimes teamed up to launch the Girl Collective, a "multigenerational sisterhood" that challenges stereotypes and builds confident in girls and young women. I'm proud to be a part of this remarkable community which illustrates the magic we can unlock when we work together to inspire change and build confidence.

Justyna Stasik

Empowering UK female business owners to start and build a business. It's that simple. My New Year's Resolution this year was to finally get my finances in check and to grow my business.

How did the Collective form? The best ideas happen when women come together! During a day packed with inspirational speakers and ideas, Kate and Sharon discussed the need for all organizations in Connecticut that serve women and girls to come together to maximize their impact. The Collective is a network that brings participating organizations together to highlight and amplify their work while drawing on the collective power of collaboration and working together. Many organizations in the state of Connecticut are doing critical work to transform the lives of women and girls everywhere. But, too often, these organizations operate separately, leading to silos.

Get it Girl Collective

We want to welcome you with open arms to a one of a kind event here in Austin. The Good Girl Collective is hosting a beauty and wellness inspired networking event at a lovely yoga studio in East Austin. Followed by a guided discussion by Jules Webber and Zakira Tenney on relationships, transparency, intention and goal setting for the New Year. Add to Calendar. View Map View Map. Find out more about how your privacy is protected.

In a country where laws still have to be passed to protect women of color from Created in by Curly Girl Collective with only 1, guests, the festival has.

As a teenager in Poland, illustrator Justyna Stasik avoided doing her homework in favour of making collages and doodling. She continued this hobby throughout university surprisingly, not art school experimenting with a Wacom tablet. It was only when Justyna landed an internship at a game tech startup that she really honed her craft. Like the Lena Dunham piece about finding coziness in a struggle with chronic pain for New York Times or the article about the weirdness of experiencing jet lag for Outline Mag. Those are mostly personal projects of course but sometimes client work happens to fit into this realm and it always makes me very happy.

The Good Girl Collective Hosts: New Year, Enhance You

The Collective has a goal to ensure girl-led and girl-centered organizations around the world have the resources and platforms they lack and need to drive change. They believe that core, unrestricted funding unlocks the greatest potential for local organizations to play a leading role in transforming societies and building gender equality. The WFGC funds 20 organizations a year as part of an awards package.

I'm quite a bit behind BUT we now have the last 3 months worth of Get it Girl Collective getitmonthly themes are live on the website! Thanks to our ama We love you!

.

.

.

.

Comments: 2
  1. Duzil

    In my opinion you are not right. Let's discuss it. Write to me in PM, we will communicate.

  2. Yonos

    The nice message

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.